SGO: Sustainable Seafood

The notion of sustainable seafood emerged in 1990 as an answer to overfishing and destructive fishing methods.Sustainable seafood refers to seafood which is caught  or farmed in ways that take into consideration the long-term vitality of harvested species, the well-being of the oceans, but also the livelihoods of fisheries-dependent communities.

Knowing what you eat is important not only for the environment but also for you. This is why it is important to choose sustainable food and you can easily recognize it after the label. Look for The Marine Stewardship Council (MSC) label  which represents sustainable fishing or for the Aquaculture Stewardship Council (ASC) which certifies sustainable farmed fish. Luckily, our university sales only MSC certified seafood, so at least you know that you can’t go wrong if you buy your sushi from campus. However, if you are buying fish from a regular supermarket, take into consideration the fact that Sainsbury’s and M&S were awarded with gold through the supermarket seafood survey, for the seafood they sell, while The Co-operative was awarded with silver and Waitrose with bronze.

If you want to take  even more action against overfishing, diversify your choices. The five most exploited fish are: Cod, Haddock, Tuna, Salmon and Prawns. So why not choose Coley or Pouting over Cod and Herring or Sardines over Tuna? Another thing you can do is look for the fish pot caught or hand lined, methods which have a lower negative impact on the environment.  In case you are buying farmed seafood, choose seafood from organic farms, which have a lower stocking density and higher environmental standards. Moreover, it is good to avoid eating deep water fish, such as sharks and other animals with a longer lifespan, because they have a slower reproduction process and it is easy to over exploit them. Also, exploiting deep water fish can harm sensitive species, which may never recover, like the cold water coral.

Think twice before you buy!

 

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Categories: Sustainability Engagement | Tags: , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

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